To kickstart your New Year’s health regime, we have compiled the top new trends for natural living in 2015. This year’s exciting new approaches to natural health will span from multi-functional and integrative products like oils and fermented foods, to high-quality supplements and effective certifications.

Here are the key trends shaking up the market this year:

New and interesting oils offering health benefits
The war on fat has taken a crucial turn and Canadians increasingly appreciate the role that certain healthy fats play in boosting our health. In 2015, look forward to seeing a growing number of healthy oil options taking Canada by storm.

Natural health products with a focus on digestion
Leaky gut… It’s a nasty name and although this concept, officially termed “intestinal permeability”, is still in its infancy, it is quickly becoming a buzz word with implications ranging from digestion to brain health.

Fermentation goes mainstream
The trend of supporting digestion and immunity is also extending to fermented foods, which are no longer limited to last year’s trendy kimchi, tempeh and sauerkraut. This year, natural health lovers will begin to find a wider variety of new foods in different fermented forms.

Pumpkin – not just for autumn decor
Natural health experts are in agreement that there is a new superfood to look out for in 2015: pumpkin. From pumpkin seeds to oil, this nutrient-rich superfood will earn its name among natural health lovers for its benefits in healthy reproduction, immune system support, and vision.

Product Certifications – Organic and GMO-free
Canadians consistently support labelling of foods containing Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs), citing consumers’ right to know where food comes from and the impact its production has on the environment. While the debate surrounding GMO foods continues, suppliers are increasingly stepping up to the plate and offering certified organic products, which is an assurance that foods are produced without the use of GMOs. This trend will continue throughout 2015 in response to consumers’ demand to know what is in their food, and increased labelling activism in Canada.

 

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