RECIPE: GLUTEN FREE VEGAN CHOCOLATE PROTEIN BALLS

vegan gluten free chocolate protein bites

These gluten free vegan balls are the perfect protein packed snack for all occasions

This is a guest post written by Erica Streick, CNP  from Organika’s Blog

These gluten free vegan protein balls are a great way to get a kick of energy during you midday slump without overloading on processed sugars and empty calories.

The cacao nibs add a nice crunch while providing high amounts of antioxidants like polyphenols, which are great for anti-aging and cardiovascular health. This snack is fiber rich making it great for blood sugar regulation, colon health, as well as keeping you satiated for longer. I added a scoop of Organika® Vege Pro plant-based protein powder to offer 21g of plant-based protein. This protein has a unique blend of 8 medicinal mushrooms containing adaptogenic and immune-modulating properties to give your immune system a boost.

Not only are these energy balls full of nutrients but they taste like a treat and satisfy any sweet cravings you may have. I make these ahead of time and keep them in the freezer since they are great for work, pre workout snacks and sweet cravings alike!

gluten free vegan chocolate protein balls

Chocolate Protein Balls

Ingredients:

  • 1 scoop of Organika® Vege Pro
  • 1/4 cup organic gluten free oats
  • 1/2 cup organic nut butter of choice (pecan butter is amazing)
  • 5 organic medjool dates, pitted
  • 1 tbsp organic cacao powder
  • 1 tbsp organic cacao nibs
  • 2 tbsp water (if required)

Directions:

  1. Place all of the ingredients into a food processor or high speed blender, and blend until the mixture becomes a dough-like consistency.
  2. Roll the dough in 1-inch balls and place in a container in the fridge or freezer.

10 Not-So-Obvious Signs Of Poor Digestion & What to Do About Them

enzyme-force-120-v-caps-300ccMost of us know the obvious symptoms of indigestion such as bloating, tummy aches, constipation and gas. You’d be surprised to know that the following 10 symptoms of enzyme deficiency might also indicate the need for supplemental digestive enzymes …

10 Not-So-Obvious Signs of Enzyme Deficiency

1.      Skin rashes and irritations. Incomplete digestion can lead to food sensitivities that manifest as skin problems.

2.      Fatigue and drowsiness. When so much energy goes to trying to compensate for a lack of digestive enzymes, is it any wonder that a body feels unbearably tired after eating?

3.      Bad breath. Our mouths are the beginning of a long digestive journey. Adequate enzymes, every step of the way, help keep breath fresher.

4.      Irritability. We all know how cranky babies get with colic. As adults with indigestion get just as irritable.

5.      Insomnia. Indigestion is noisy and painful. A happy calm yummy is crucial for a good night’s sleep.

6.      High cholesterol. All the way back in 1958, Stratford researchers realised that low enzymes and high cholesterol were linked.

7.      Weight gain. Fat utilisation is improved with enzymes, leading to less of it being stored in the obvious places – hips, belly, upper arms, thighs.

8.      Food allergies. Without adequate protein digesting enzymes, undigested food particles leak through the intestinal wall, triggering food allergy symptoms.

9.      Inflammation. Inflammation from injuries or arthritic conditions have been shown to respond well to the anti-inflammatory effect of bromelain.

10.    Sinusitis. An increased incidence of sinusitis might be related to chronic inflammation in nasal mucous membranes.

Eat More Raw Foods for Better Digestion

Eating enzyme-rich, fresh raw fruits and vegetables is definitely the best prescription for good digestion. Ironically though, improving your diet can cause some temporary indigestion. Remember, it takes time for your body to adjust, especially when drastically changing your diet to include the extra fibre consumed by eating more fresh fruits and vegetables. Fibre-rich foods can cause gas and bloating until your body adjusts.

Fortunately, digestive enzymes – especially Enzyme-Force with Fibrazyme™ can help with the transition. Bon apetite!

10 Easy Ways to Improve Digestion

  1. Take Prairie Naturals Digestive Enzymes at every meal
  2. Breathe deeply and relax before beginning a meal
  3. Be thankful for what you are about to enjoy
  4. Eat an abundance of fibre-rich foods
  5. Eat more raw fruits and vegetables
  6. Drink more water (between meals)
  7. Go for a walk after a meal
  8. Chew effectively and for a longer period of time
  9. Sit down to eat
  10. Eat less

How Our Digestive System Works

Just imagine a 30-foot maze-like passageway winding its way through the centre of your body. This miraculous food transport system is your digestive tract. The digestive tract, also called the gastrointestinal tract, has numerous connecting points along its route where food is broken down into simpler chemical forms (nutrients) by specialised enzymes. Digestion and absorption of macro-nutrients (proteins, carbohydrates and fats) and micro-nutrients (vitamins and minerals) are dependent on enzymes and by the health of the duodenum.  

The Mouth & Stomach

The smell and sight of appetising food is the first signal the digestive system receives to begin the amazing process of digestion. Even before the first morsel of food enters your mouth, the digestive juices start flowing.

With the first bite, ptyalin, an amylase enzyme in saliva, begin the breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose. Chewing food well (some experts recommend 100 times per bite) promotes better digestion even before food enters the stomach where the most active chemical digestion begins. Stomach muscle contractions assist the digestive process by kneading the partially digested food while gastric juices containing hydrochloric acid (HCI), pepsin, rennin and water begin the protein-digesting process. Some fat, and to a lesser degree, carbohydrates (which have been converted to sucrose) are also partially digested at this phase of the digestive process.

This potent mix of chemicals is so strong that the stomach’s membrane lining secretes a protective mucous barrier to prevent these corrosive gastric juices from damaging the walls of the stomach.  Without adequate mucosal protection, the stomach lining would be burned by its own acids, creating painful stomach ulcers. Digestive activity in the stomach lasts from one to four hours per meal depending on the combination and amounts of food ingested.

Liquids pass through the stomach most quickly; next come carbohydrates, then proteins, and finally fats. The secretion of intrinsic factor is another important function of the stomach. This protein substance is absolutely necessary for the absorption of vitamin B12 during the next stage of digestion in the small intestine. The pyloric sphincter at the base of the stomach opens to release this mash of semi-digested food, called chyme, into the small intestine.

The Small Intestine

There is not much that is “small” about the small intestine. In fact, this 20-foot section of the digestive tract is charged with achieving a huge task – the unlocking and absorption of micro-nutrients from macro-nutrients. The activity of enzymes in the small intestine is supported by enzymes contained within the food we eat or enzyme supplementation we take. Over the course of approximately three hours, the small intestine, with the aid of the pancreas, liver and gall-bladder, breaks down proteins into amino acids, carbohydrates into simple sugars, and fats into fatty acids.

As chyme enters the small intestine, the pancreas, nestled below the stomach, contributes alkaline pancreatic juices necessary for the successful completion of the digestive process. These juices contain numerous enzymes.

If fats have been eaten, the gall-bladder releases the bile it has stored. Bile is produced by the liver and is not really an enzyme, but rather a fat emulsifier that separates fat into small droplets that pancreatic enzymes break down for absorption.

The small intestine is comprised of three sections, the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Each of these sections absorbs different nutrients through the intestinal walls. For example, calcium, vitamin A, thiamine and riboflavin are absorbed by the duodenum. The jejunum absorbs fat and the ileum absorbs vitamin  B12.

The Large Intestine

Basically used as a holding tank for waste produced through the digestive process, the large intestine, also referred to as the colon, is largely an elimination organ, although vitamin K, water and some electrolyte minerals are absorbed in this final section of the digestive tract. A great many bacteria live in the colon, some of them friendly and beneficial, and others, harmful and disruptive. Inadequately digested food substances can be absorbed by the body as toxins or can feed noxious intestinal bacteria.

Proper elimination of waste and bacteria from the colon is dependent upon a high fibre diet, adequate water intake, healthy intestinal flora and complete digestion of food. Fibre literally binds toxins and aids their passage through the colon while water encourages smoother elimination. Fibre also encourages the growth of healthy intestinal flora (probiotics).

Having a clearer understanding and deeper appreciation of the way our bodies process and utilise the foods we eat will ideally help us be more mindful of the choices we make that affect this daily miracle that we simply call “digestion”.  Bon appetite!

FEATURED PRODUCT – Molkosan

An A.Vogel Super FoodMolkosan

By Josée Fortin, biochemist and naturopath

There is lots of talk these days about new super foods. Well, Molkosan® is one of them… but it’s hardly new! In 1947, Alfred Vogel was already very fond of his formula and repeatedly praised its beneficial qualities.

This Vogel favourite is made from natural lacto-fermented whey. This preserves the minerals contained in whey, including calcium, potassium and magnesium. Molkosan is rich in lactic acid, which is put to good use in dietetics and natural medicine. Alfred Vogel’s favourite whey formula has been reformulated to not only taste better, but also for added benefits.

 

How do we obtain Molkosan?

First, milk is curdled due to the action of special enzymes to obtain cheese and whey. The whey is then fermented with the help of our own licensed bacterial cultures which produce a high amount of lactic acid L (+). This is called the lacto-fermentation phase. Finally, we separate the whey from the protein and it is concentrated in a vacuum, preserving all of its qualities.

 

What does it do?

Fermented whey balances the body’s pH or acid-base level. High body
acidity has multiple causes, including excessive consumption of refined foods, insufficient water intake, lack of oxygen, excess chemical compounds in the environment (over 70,000 compounds) and, especially, a disrupted intestinal flora.

 

High body acidity is a sign that the pH of the intestine is too alkaline and that the alkaline minerals such as calcium, potassium, magnesium and sodium are not properly assimilated. This is linked to a long list of health
problems, including poor stress management, sleep disorders, allergies, food intolerance, yeast infections, joint and muscle disorders (including cramps), osteoporosis, anaemia, heart disease, high blood pressure, digestive tube inflammation, eczema and psoriasis, migraines, infections, bone fractures and gallstones.

 

Molkosan is rich in essential minerals, but its main action lies in
maintaining the intestinal pH balance, thus helping our body to absorb basic minerals found in our food. This, in turn, helps restore our entire body’s pH level. To be assimilated, basic minerals need to bind to mild acids – such as the lactic acid in Molkosan. Restoring our body’s pH level helps avoid or eliminate the health problems mentioned above. For example, a proper pH level in the mucous membrane of the digestive tract can help relieve heartburn and stomach ulcers.

 

Molkosan’s mild cleansing action can also help with weight loss. Our body
stores toxins in fat cells to minimize their destructive effects. To protect itself from toxins and maintain enough fat cells, our body will actually prevent weight loss! Molkosan also has a regulating effect on sugar levels, thus
reducing sugar and starch cravings and stabilizing insulin levels. When insulin levels are high, fat cells store more fat…

 

Lacto-fermentation helps promote a healthy intestinal flora and slows the proliferation of fungus. Those friendly bacteria in the gut do a great job in helping ward off infections. Seventy percent of our immune system is found in the intestines!

 

Molkosan provides well-being from the inside through its gentle daily cleansing and pH-balancing action. It maintains a healthy intestinal flora; especially in the case of bacterial upset or gastric acidity. In addition, because Molkosan is lactose-free, it presents no digestive problems for lactose-intolerant or lactose-sensitive individuals.

 

Molkosan goes very well with Boldocynara and Stinging Nettle to create a great spring cleanse.  Before you start any cleanse you’ll want to make sure you Pretox

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