Creating Beautiful Hair…Naturally

Not all chemicals are “unnatural” and dangerous  to human or environmental health. There are many natural chemicals such as the ones found in grapefruit seeds and apple cider vinegar which are beneficial to our health and environment. Here’s a sample list of some of the health-endangering ingredients that Prairie Naturals never uses in any of our hair care products.

Prairie Naturals Hair Care formulas deliver the cleansing, conditioning & styling support your hair needs without the use of harmful ingredients. Prairie Naturals Hair Care products create beautiful, healthy hair without dangerous ingredients.

Beautiful Hair without Dangerous Ingredients

 

ULTRA-SIL™ 500 mg

  • Promotes beautifully healthy hair, skin and nails!
  • Supports the skeletal system
  • Provides superior source of organic silica
  • Aqueous extract of Spring Horsetail (Equisetum arvense)
  • Specially processed for best assimilation
  • Rich source of trace minerals
  • Strengthens bones

 

HAIR-FORCE™

  • Counteracts stress, illness, hormonal imbalances
  • Stimulates maximum growth of hair follicle
  • 22 natural nutrients restore, repair & nourish
  • Creates beautiful, healthy hair from within
  • Easy-to-absorb softgels
  • Minimizes hair loss
  • Love Your Hair!

 

 

Prairie Naturals award-winning hair care products are formulated with natural ingredients to give you beautiful, healthy looking hair without the questionable additives. Each Prairie Naturals Hair Care formula is carefully crafted using the rich, nourishing ingredients found in nature…moisturizing Jojoba oil and Shea butter, soothing Aloe Vera and stimulating Tea Tree oil are but a few of the precious ingredients that work to give you healthy, manageable, gorgeous hair. Our premium quality, award-winning shampoos, conditioners and styling aids deliver the results you demand with concentrated nutrients, botanical extracts and pure plant essential oils.

Here’s a sample list of some of the health-endangering ingredients that Prairie Naturals never uses in any of our hair care products. You’ll quickly see why.

 

  • most widely used, broad-spectrum preservatives worldwide Also known as methyl-, propyl, butyl- and ethyl- parabens or under the name Germaben, these toxic substances can be absorbed through the skin, are linked to developmental and reproductive toxicity as well as toxicity in wildlife. They are weakly estrogenic (may cause hormone dependent cancers) and can negatively impact the immune system.
  • Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and its chemical cousins are standard ingredients in anything that foams. They are among the most irritating ingredients in personal care products causing dandruff-like scalp conditions, skin rashes, eye and lung irritations, and are also toxic to aquatic organisms. It is frequently disguised in semi-natural cosmetics with the explanation “comes from coconut”.
  • This chemical threesome: DEA (diethanolamine), MEA (monoethanolamine) and TEA (triethanolamine) and related compounds are used as foaming or emulsifying agents and can form cancer-causing compounds called nitrosamines when they come in contact with other nitrogen containing compounds found in cosmetics.
  • Propylene glycol, often used as an emulsifier/moisturizer, is a petrochemical also used in antifreeze and brake fluid. It is an inexpensive, synthetic humectant and emulsifier. Known as a primary irritant to skin, eyes and lungs, it penetrates the skin very quickly and may encourage liver and kidney issues.
  • A synthetic emollient, it’s the most extensively used ingredient in body care products and the single greatest cause of breakouts in women who use a new product. While covering the skin, it clogs pores and traps toxins and wastes inside the skin layers preventing the skins ability to respire.
  • Phthalates (pronounced tha-lates) are industrial plasticizers known to be one of the foremost dangers found in cosmetics and personal care products. Dozens of studies have shown that phthalates disrupt and inhibit normal hormonal functions, causing infertility and birth defects.
  • The chemical colours used in shampoos and scores of other products are labeled as FD&C or D&C followed by a color and a number. These synthetic colours are made from coal tar and contain heavy metal salts that can deposit toxins onto the skin and cause cancer.
  • Artificial fragrances can generate a variety of instant adverse reactions including headaches, dizziness, rash, redness, violent coughing and vomiting. These chemical fragrances often contain a toxic cocktail of more than 200 chemicals including endocrine disrupting phthalates.

Why is sugar bad for you?

Gleaned from:  http://www.livescience.com/36188-sugar-bad.html

Professional opinions on the dangers of sugar:  

Dr. Zachary Bloomgarden, professor at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine believes:

Sugar is bad for you a because it has calories, and because if you have diabetes or a diabetes-related condition — let’s say high blood fat levels — then having sugar will increase your blood sugar and your triglycerides, which is a risk factor for heart disease. (Triglycerides are a type of fat in the blood.)

If you have someone who has diabetes, their problem is that either they aren’t producing insulin, or are resistant to it. Without insulin, eating sugar will increase blood sugar.  But, essentially, diabetes is not just about blood sugar. It’s about, blood sugar and triglycerides, and lipid levels.

Sugar is very calorie-dense. So you can easily consume a lot of sugar in soft drinks, and in all kinds of food that contain added sugar. It’s not that the sugar calories are more fattening than any other calories. It’s just calories are calories, and sugar packs a lot.

Rachel Johnson, professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont in Burlington believes:

The bottom line is that sugar does one of two things. It either displaces more nutritious foods in your diet, which means you’re screening out nutritious-dense foods, or it adds calories to your diet. So if you’re adding calories on top of an already nutritious diet that puts you at risk for weight gain.

There’s been a lot of research in recent years looking at the impact of added sugars — not the sugar naturally occurring in fruits and dairy products. What we know is that added sugars put you at a higher risk for a poor lipid (fats) profile: Higher triglycerides, lower HDL (the good cholesterol) and higher LDL levels (the bad cholesterol) in the blood. A poor lipid profile increases your risk for coronary heart disease.

There’s also been some research that has shown that added sugars increase your risk of high blood pressure. And added sugars seem to promote inflammation, and more and more we find that inflammation is not good for the heart.

Marisa Moore, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics believes: 

There are several problems with excess sugar. All types of sugars do promote tooth decay. The more often you’re eating sugary foods, then the more often you give that bacteria in your mouth time to go to work on the sugar.

When we look at the types of foods that are high in added sugar, they often are not high in nutrition. So eating a lot of sugar is a general indication that maybe you aren’t eating as healthy of a diet as you could.

The other problem is that it can be a contributor to obesity and weight gain, that is because you are replacing foods that would be nutrient-dense with empty calories.

Weight gain has been associated with high risk of heart disease, diabetes and certain types of cancer. Sugar, no matter, where it’s coming from, does tend to increase our triglycerides, or fat levels in the blood, and higher triglycerides increase your risk for heart disease. Everything goes back to heart disease; it is the number one killer of Americans.

Stephanie Dunbar, director of nutrition and medical affairs at the American Diabetes Association believes: 

There’s a couple issues with sugar. The biggest thing is that there’s no nutritional value. Foods that tend to have a lot of sugar added, they don’t provide the satiety that you get from other more healthful foods, so people tend to consume more calories when they eat foods with more sugar in it.

The other worry is sugar-sweetened beverages. If you eat a cookie or a piece of cake, you have hormones to signal that you feel like you’ve had something to eat. That doesn’t happen with a soda.

It doesn’t mean that people can’t have a treat occasionally, but most Americans are getting too many calories through sugary foods and sugar-sweetened beverages. That means you’re not getting fiber, you’re not getting vitamins, minerals.

What we recommend for diabetics, is if someone’s going to have a small piece of cake, or a small piece of pie, then you would cut back on the other carbohydrates in the meal. If you normally have half a cup of rice, if the treat is going to be one cookie, then you have to have very little rice. The portion sizes for the most sweets are very small, but the sweets aren’t. The cookies they sell in the stores, some have 400 calories. A cookie is equal to a large salad in terms of carbohydrates.

Mary Ellen DiPaola, dietitian at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center believes: 

Glucose is the body’s major fuel and is broken down from carbohydrates, a combination of sugar molecules, in the foods we eat. Simple sugars such as sucrose (table sugar) and juice (fructose) are composed of only one or two sugar molecules and are converted to blood glucose faster than more complex carbohydrates like whole grains and vegetables.

Carbohydrates come from all food groups except proteins and fats. Fruits, vegetables, starchy foods, milk and yogurt are all sources of carbohydrates. Sweet foods and beverages such as baked goods, frozen desserts, candy, juice, soft drinks and other sweet liquids also contain carbohydrates in the form of simple sugar. Table sugar, honey, molasses, syrup, jelly/jam, and any other sweet additions are also carbohydrates termed as “simple.”

All these very tasty and fun foods and beverages can displace more nutritious complex carbohydrates, which provide vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, and fiber — a multitude of power-packed nutrition. Simple sugar is also correlated with tooth caries (cavities), poor energy levels, and can lead to sugar cravings as the body never becomes fully satisfied from healthful foods.

Eating naturally sweet fruits and dairy or dairy substitutes (i.e. soy milk) can also satisfy sweet cravings as well as take the place of simple sugar treats.

 

6 Tips for Choosing Natural Sunscreen

Here’s something that should be top of mind this summer: stocking up on natural sunscreen. Here are a few foolproof tips to ensure you’re getting the best product for you and your family.

Opt for cream

Keep it simple: the best sunscreen formulations, as recommended by the Environmental Working Group, are the plain liquid cream forms that we grew up using. Other forms, such as sprays, powders, or towelettes don’t guarantee that we get proper coverage. Plus, spray formulations pose inhalation safety risks.

Oh, and you can forget about the sunscreen/bug repellent duos: these products are better on their own, since they usually have separate usage times in the day and different usage directions. 

Don’t be fooled by high SPFs

Trick question: does SPF 60 filter out twice the amount of UVB radiation SPF 30 does? Nope, even though many people think so. In fact, SPF 30 filters out 97 percent of rays, while SPF 50 only filters out an additional 1 percent. That’s why experts worry that people are led astray by high SPFs. Plus, high SPFs are often filled with higher doses of chemicals than lower SPFs.

Generally, higher SPFs are no better than mid-range SPFs. Choose an SPF 30, and reapply often. 

Be wary of moisturizers with SPF

Just as people tend to fall back on believing that higher SPFs will protect them, we also have tendency to believe that the small amount of sunscreen in facial moisturizer or makeup is enough. Generally, it’s not. And remember: sunscreen should be applied more than once a day. 

Avoid vitamin A and oxybenzone

These are two sneaky ingredients that seem to find their way into many mainstream products. Oxybenzone is suspected to play a role in allergic reactions and hormonal disruptions, while vitamin A (or retinyl palmitate) is thought by the EWG to play a role in the development of skin tumours, and it increases skin sensitivity to sunlight. 

Choose mineral sunscreens

What’s the best active ingredient? Mineral sunscreens made from zinc oxide or titanium dioxide are generally believed to be safe. 

Check out your natural health retailer

While you’ll still likely need to do some product label reading, the best place to start your sunscreen shopping is at your natural health retailer. They’ll have the biggest range of natural products and knowledgeable staff to help you choose. Like any skin care product, you may want to try a couple brands to find one that you really love. Thankfully, there’s lots of selection on the market!

Gleaned From Alive Magazine Online

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